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Posts Tagged ‘Trust in government’

As American as apple pie

April 20th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

April really is the cruelest month.

April 19, 1995 — the Oklahoma City bombing. 168 killed.

April 19, 1993 — the Waco siege ends with a catastrophic fire. 76 dead.

April 20, 1999 — the Columbine school shootings. 13 dead.

April 16, 2007 — the Virginia Tech shootings. 32 people murdered.

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The Tea Partiers: Hating Big Brother

April 7th, 2010

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This piece was originally posted in National Journal.

What’s driving the ferocious backlash against health care reform?

Some see racism and bigotry. Anti-immigration sentiment is certainly a component of the backlash. The outburst by Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., (“You lie!”) during President Obama’s health care speech in September to a joint session of Congress was triggered by the president’s statement that the legislation would not provide free coverage to illegal immigrants.

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Making health reform work

April 1st, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

With the passage of historic health care reform legislation, Democrats are rightly eager to explain what’s in the new law and ensure that Americans realize its immediate benefits. As Democrats see it, the more Americans learn the facts about reform, the more they will appreciate it.

But what could ultimately shape the public’s views are Americans’ direct experiences with reform. For better or for worse, health care reform — one of the greatest expansions of federal power in a half-century — occurred at a time of historically low trust in government. Opinion polls show barely one in five Americans believe the federal government does the right thing all or most of the time.

That means Democrats must now make the task of consumer-friendly reform its top priority.

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The Danger Of Compromise On Health Care

February 20th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in National Journal.

Republicans know one big thing about health care reform: Helping to derail President Clinton’s reform plan in 1994 did wonders for them politically.

Actually, they know another big thing as well: For the past year, they have resisted President Obama’s health care reform plan, and once again things seem to be working out well for them politically. The evidence is the outcome of the statewide elections in Virginia, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. So what if Democrats call Republicans the “Party of No”? “No” seems to be what voters want to hear.

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Congress Should Extend a Helping Hand to Homeowners

February 12th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Roll Call.

The past two years dealt a punishing blow to the personal wealth of millions of middle-class homeowners. Amid rising foreclosures and plummeting home values, Americans lost more than $4 trillion in home equity. Ten million American households — or more than 1 in 5 homeowners — are currently “under water,” owing more on their mortgages than what their homes are worth. Millions more have lost the equity they were counting on to send their kids to college, save for retirement or to have as a nest egg for emergencies.

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A Populist Eruption In Massachusetts?

January 15th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in National Journal.

Imagine this OMG moment for Democrats: a Massachusetts Republican wins Edward Kennedy’s Senate seat.

What an upset that would be. It’s JFK’s old seat, for goodness sake. After JFK won the presidency in 1960, the seat was occupied for two years by his former Harvard roommate until Edward Kennedy was old enough to run. He won the seat in 1962 and held it for 47 years. Massachusetts has not elected a Republican to the Senate since 1972. Right now, the state’s congressional delegation does not include a single Republican.

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