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Blue World Order

December 7th, 2012

by and

This post was originally published in Foreign Policy

For Republicans, the recent U.S. presidential election was supposed to be 1980. They would paint President Barack Obama as Jimmy Carter—weak on the economy and weak on national security. High unemployment and low growth? Check. National security? Democratic presidential candidates—from Carter to John Kerry—were often hobbled by public doubts about their fitness to protect the United States from foreign threats (see: “Dukakis, tank“).

But not this year. For the first time in decades, Democrats had a presidential candidate with an advantage on these issues. Obama entered the 2012 election with a successful foreign-policy record: The U.S. war in Iraq was over, the war in Afghanistan was winding down, Osama bin Laden was dead, al Qaeda’s top ranks were decimated, Libyan dictator Muammar al-Qaddafi was toppled, and an international coalition had been assembled to impose the toughest-ever sanctions on Iran. Read the rest of this entry »

Dems can gain ground with security

September 29th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

The “Pledge to America” that House Republican leaders released last week offers little in the way of new ideas about national security – mostly procedural bits, like a pledge to hold hearings on Iran or changes in visa paperwork. That is a sea change from the days when the first Republican talking point involved going after Democrats on national security.

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Bennett & Rosner: Democrats and National Security

June 3rd, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

Slightly more than 10 days ago, a U.S. airstrike killed Sheikh Said Al-Masri, Al Qaeda’s third in command. He was the highest level Al Qaeda operative to be “removed from the battlefield,” as the military puts it. The Wall Street Journal actually said in its editorial: “another success for the Obama administration.”

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