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Who really abandoned Dems?

November 18th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

Conventional wisdom is hardening on two fronts in the aftermath of the election—among Democrats about how to regain power and among Republicans about what to do with it.

Many Democrats argue, and now believe, that disenchanted liberal base voters were the ones who stayed home and that this election was a referendum on the economy. Many Republicans, on the other hand, now believe their own press about a definitive, albeit tea party-tinged, mandate.

Conventional wisdom, it turns out, is wrong.

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What Dems Need: A Moderate Surge

October 1st, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

With the worries over an “enthusiasm gap,” many Democrats are now contemplating a home-stretch election strategy focused on rousing the base. By carrying a left-leaning message, this argument goes, Democrats can reactivate liberal enthusiasm to equal the Tea Party’s passion.

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Have Degree: Will Work for Food

May 24th, 2010

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A college diploma was once a permanent ticket to job security. But today’s graduates are seeing many more rejection letters than paychecks in what’s become the worst job market for new graduates in decades.

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Key to U.S. growth is building wealth, not entitlements

May 6th, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

For much of the 20th century, progressives put their political capital into building a safety net to protect Americans against market excesses. They aimed for economic security from cradle to retirement.

Today, many on the left say that health care reform is just one more step in this effort.

But it would be a mistake for Democrats to make expanding the entitlement state the defining goal in the 21st century as well.

Rather, they should focus on a new signature cause: policies that build national and individual wealth.

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Making health reform work

April 1st, 2010

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This piece was originally published in Politico.

With the passage of historic health care reform legislation, Democrats are rightly eager to explain what’s in the new law and ensure that Americans realize its immediate benefits. As Democrats see it, the more Americans learn the facts about reform, the more they will appreciate it.

But what could ultimately shape the public’s views are Americans’ direct experiences with reform. For better or for worse, health care reform — one of the greatest expansions of federal power in a half-century — occurred at a time of historically low trust in government. Opinion polls show barely one in five Americans believe the federal government does the right thing all or most of the time.

That means Democrats must now make the task of consumer-friendly reform its top priority.

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Don’t Pass the Buck for the Obesity Epidemic

March 19th, 2010

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This piece was originally published on Huffington Post.

Despite the fact that Americans spend at least $30 billion a year on diet pills and weight-loss products, one-third of American adults are obese, while one third of children are obese or overweight. Obesity-related health problems account for $150 billion in medical spending a year–or nine percent of our nation’s total medical costs.

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